Saving Hope

Published July 6, 2013 by myliteraryleanings

saving hope cover

Review of Saving Hope by Margaret Daley

Overview from www.bn.com:

When a teenager goes missing from the Beacon of Hope School, Texas Ranger Wyatt Sheridan and school director Kate Winslow are forced into a dangerous struggle against a human trafficking organization. But the battle brings dire consequences as Wyatt’s daughter is terrorized and Kate is kidnapped.

Now it’s personal, and Wyatt finds both his faith and investigative skills challenged as she fights to discover the mastermind behind the ring before evil destroys everyone he loves.

“Fan favorite Margaret Daley wows readers with Saving Hope, her new release in the Men of the Texas Rangers series. Intense, gritty, exciting, and with a compelling love story…this book has everything a romantic suspense reader could want!” Marta Perry, Vanish in Plain Sight, HQN Books

My Review:

My reading week was rough one this time around. Though I read three books this week, I only found one that I was willing to review. (The other two gave me nightmares and since I don’t wish to visit those horrible dreams again, I am going to skip the review.)

That left one book which was also a little scary too but as bad as the other two books. So Saving Hope is the winner and the first in series about Texas Rangers apparently.

It deals with the serious but relevant topic of human trafficking. I could throw out a bunch of statistics at this point but suffice it to say that this crime is on the rise and features in the news more and more these days. It is no longer isolated to third-world countries. It goes on right here in the good old USA as well.

The book features a Texas Ranger of course (named Wyatt) but it begins with a girl named Rose. Rose lives at a home of sorts for former runaway underage prostitutes. Rose gets a call from a friend who was caught up in the life she was in but says that she wants to get out. Without thinking, Rose “borrows” the facility’s van to pick-up her friend and ends up getting captured again by her former pimp.

Kate is the direction of the facility Beacon of Hope where Rose and other girls like her are hiding out in hopes of starting a new life. When Kate discovers Rose is missing she decides that she will not rest till she finds out what has happened to her since she doubts very much that Rose has chosen to go back to her former life. Along the way her faith the characters are tested. Do they have what it takes to help these girls and break-up this prostitution ring that has plagued the Dallas area? That is the question that drives the story.

I’ll start with the bad first. This is just me but I really didn’t like the romance element in the story. It seemed a bit unrealistic. Of course, I am not a big fan of romances generally anyway but it was a bit of a disappointment with how detailed the human trafficking angle seemed to be. The author clearly did her research on that part and it seemed like the romance was an afterthought. In fact, I think it would have been better if it had been minimized more.

The good parts were first, as mentioned above; the whole human trafficking part of the story was fascinating and appeared to ring true. Of course I am not an expert but I was really drawn into that aspect of the plot which is what most of the book focused on. It was a little depressing but that’s to be expected.

The other plus was that the Christian element of the story seemed realistic as well and not forced like I find in many other Christian books I read. I appreciated that. The characters have real struggles and doubts. Though they are mostly good people (except for the traffickers of course), they don’t seem overly saccharine or unrelatable.

So to sum up, I found the story to be good but I couldn’t say that I loved it for the reasons I previously mentioned. Still I would recommend it for any reader who might want to learn more about this type of crime without wanting to be totally depressed coming away from it.

Contains: some violence and sexual situations

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